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Archive for the tag “Huffington Post”

The Lost Art of Letter Writing

Hello Dear Followers,

When I think letter writing I think of it as an act of  romance, something so personal and in the 21st century, so lost in the age of e-mail, Twitter, Facebook, texting and the internet as a whole.

As many of you have read in my previous post, I am reading “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society”  and the book is not made up of chapters, but rather of letters between several characters in the book, which at first I thought was great, then I thought well this could take a forever and hard to keep up with who is writing to who.

But as I have gone on, I can see why it was done this way, because I can’t see how else the two authors would have conveyed this story, how they would have properly introduced these characters as they have.

While the ability to communicate with people far away from us has gotten a lot easier, far easier than our parents,  grandparents and great-grandparents for that matter, it lacks personality and lacks the proof that someone dedicated the time to write  a letter with an actual  pen and paper.

It is so easy to send off an e-mail, often times without thinking. I’ve done it. Often times we don’t even realize what we are writing because we are in such a hurry to get on to the next thing in our lives, we don’t stop and think of our words.

I’ve always been old-fashioned and very nostalgic in many ways, when I was 13 or 14 years old, I wrote letters to all my friends who were near and dear to me at the time, many thought I was odd, because what 14-year-old spends the time to write an individual letter to someone?  That would be me.

When I was 18, I wrote an e-mail to a boy I liked in high school telling him how I felt, you could call that both ballsy and very 21st century.  That was the way people began to communicate, how they expressed themselves.  Writing a letter with a pen and paper began to be long lost memory.

I returned to the art of writing a letter (via pen and paper) a few years  later to someone I felt was of great importance to my life at the time. It felt more personal, I felt there was a deeper connection because I had taken the time to write several drafts before I could perfect what I wanted to say to this person.  It was me, it wasn’t an e-mail set up by the internet  it was just me, a pen and paper.

This art of letter writing is fading, Andrew Lam, author and editor of New America Media writes about this exact topic in a  blog post “The Lost Art of Letter Writing” on the  Huffington Post.  

“For the rest of us in this age of mobility and information, there simply isn’t any time for such a thing as a long, flowing, hand-written letter. I am no exception,” says Mr. Lam in his post.

Catherine Field, an I.H.T Op-Ed contributor of the New York Times says in her Op-Ed piece “The Fading Art of Letter Writing”:  “Letter-writing is among our most ancient of arts. Think of letters and the mind falls on Paul of Tarsus, Abraham Lincoln, Jane Austen, Mark Twain; on love letters written during the American Civil War, or letters written to a parent by a frightened soldier at the battlefront.”  

There is a ton more on this subject, because it is clearly something we don’t do in a digital age. And I am someone who loves digital as the next person, but I think we should revive this lost art and bring it back to something more personal, romantic and connected.

Don’t you agree?

Until next time….

Fight to the Death

Hello Dear Followers,

I am not quite sure where to begin with tonight’s post. I am six chapters into “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins and I am not sure of my comments so far.  I think its good, but I find it strange, the names and places.

For the last few days now, I was thinking about what I would write for this post and I honestly don’t know what to make of anything I have read. I have to agree with a recent Huffington Post article  I read recently –“The True Story Behind The Hunger Games”

The author has tackled real issues  like class inequity, food shortages, insufficient education and training, population control through imports/exports, threat of nuclear war, people from other districts, or maybe we should call them ethnic groups, fighting to survive, according to the article.

The author has neatly packaged this thrilling story in the young adult genre almost making it sound magical in some strange way by using different ( and definitely strange) names of places and people.  Making the reader really think could this actually happen one day? Hundreds of years from now or even earlier?

I find it very interesting how reality television is used here. On so many of today’s reality television shows, people whether they be regular people or celebrities are fighting for something whether it be a moment in the spotlight or fighting to the death in some way or another.

I honestly don’t know what to say here, I don’t I haven’t really made any sense about what I have read. I will check back soon!

Until next time..

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